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Procyon
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Got promoted after 1 year of work, having really be loyal and not complaining about countless hours of overtime. Feeling sad because now I have to leave my hometown and have to live in the "big city" and have to live an urban life while I love to live in an rural environment. Liking the money, but have to spend much more of it for my apartment.

 

Will miss my friends.

 

Guess you can't have everything.

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After way two many years of unemployment and sex magic i finally got admitted in a public work rehab facility : i earn enought to eat organic and smoke the "Spice" wich extends life and cures cancer.

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I'm currently working in Japan, for an Eikaiwa company (foreign language instruction as a business). I've been here for 10 years now, watched the company go bankrupt an get taken over by another one. They cut costs, i.e. our salaries and made us work all the time we were being paid. It was a hell too much for a lot of us who'd gotten used to getting paid a lot to do close to fuck all work, a lot left for greener pastures, most to attempt to come back later as the ass fell out of the whole market. I stayed and ended up getting promoted for no extra money: lots of extra work for no extra pay was not ideal but after a year I renegotiated my salary back to what it was before.

 

This year I was promoted to area manager of Tokyo which is by far the biggest in the country, no extra salary but the added bonuses each year makes up for the added work and all the fucktards I have to deal with, seriously I cannot believe the number of Americans who think they're the best thing ever while actually being semi retarded, the number of Brits that won't come to work for the stupidest reasons, the Aussies who can't keep from getting sick, the Kiwis who can't get out of bed to come to work and the Canadians who are so paranoid they won't even take the company health check.

 

In my time I've done training, recruitment and management. During my time recruiting, I had a hit tonne of applicants who I couldn't believe could make it through a day without killing themselves let alone travel abroad and get a job.

 

CVs (Resumes) I rejected:

 

People who had had lots of jobs in a short period of time

People who couldn't spell

People with rotten grammar

People far too qualified for the position and any likely future positions

People who had large gaps in their employment history

 

Interviewees I rejected:

 

People who wouldn't stop talking

People who couldn't communicate at all

People who slagged off their previous employers

People who said they'd never had a problem in previous jobs

People who had no idea about the company

The guy who showed up in a tracksuit

The guy who was late because he got distracted using facebook (actual excuse)

Everyone who was late for no reason.

The guy who answered his phone during the interview

The guy who came drunk

The guy who wouldn't believe the interview was no smoking

 

I'm so glad I don't do that anymore, it was soul destroying to see how many different ways people can fuck up a job application.

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Out of curiosity, why did you reject resumes that were too qualified? I've read about that being a source of frustration for job hunters who got laid off for no reason of their own and can't even get crappy jobs because they look overqualified.

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They are much less likely to stay very long in a job with a salary much lower than they can get elsewhere with they're qualifications. I don't want to waste time and money training them, just for them to quit 3 months in for a better job. In the past this has happened repeatedly so now I just reject them. Those that don't quit because they can't find a better job are rarely happy and create an uncomfortable working environment for others.

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Interviewees I rejected:

 

People who slagged off their previous employers

People who said they'd never had a problem in previous jobs

I hope you're referring to extreme cases or that would be a harsh interview.

 

"Well, I had problems with my previous employer..."

"Out!"

 

"I didn't have problems with my previous employer..."

"Out!"

 

People who couldn't spell

People with rotten grammar

They are much less likely to stay very long in a job with a salary much lower than they can get elsewhere with they're qualifications.

Out!

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Haha, you caught me. However if I was sending a CV to a company I'd make sure I checked it first ;)

 

And yes, the people I rejected for slagging off their ( ;)) former employers got really angry when I asked about any previous conflict they'd had. One started shaking and didn't calm down until after the interview.

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CVs (Resumes) I rejected:

 

People who had large gaps in their employment history

Having encountered this several times, it just pisses me the fuck off. I'm unsure of what counts as a ''large gap'' in this case but most of the time, I'm almost certain many can't help it.

 

(Not directed at you personally, Abasio)

 

Interviewees I rejected:

 

The guy who showed up in a tracksuit

The guy who was late because he got distracted using facebook (actual excuse)

The guy who came drunk

The guy who wouldn't believe the interview was no smoking

So hilarious, yet so sad.

 

:lol:

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Having encountered this several times, it just pisses me the fuck off. I'm unsure of what counts as a ''large gap'' in this case but most of the time, I'm almost certain many can't help it.

 

(Not directed at you personally, Abasio)

 

 

So hilarious, yet so sad.

 

:lol:

 

 

Basically years unaccounted for, not studying, training in a job finding program, looking after a sick relative, attempting their own enterprise or the sort of thing that can account for being out of work. I know it's hard to find a job, which is why it's important to be doing something worthwhile when out of work. Be it training or volunteer work, it fills the gap on the cv and looks more attractive to potential employers.

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Basically years unaccounted for, not studying, training in a job finding program, looking after a sick relative, attempting their own enterprise or the sort of thing that can account for being out of work. I know it's hard to find a job, which is why it's important to be doing something worthwhile when out of work. Be it training or volunteer work, it fills the gap on the cv and looks more attractive to potential employers.

How about: "For the last three years I've been catching up on internet porn"

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How about: "For the last three years I've been catching up on internet porn"

 

Hey, at least it would be an honest answer, while many of those other excuses could be lies.

 

Reminds me of one case when we had a position open. Our group leader asked one candidate "Why are you interested in this job?" He answered "Actually, I'm not". He was admirably honest about that, yet didn't get hired. Afterwards, this led to an interesting discussion about how an otherwise similar candidate who simply lied convincingly to that question could have got the job. Of equivalent options, the system prefers liars. Weird, isn't it?

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I will need new work in the new year as my favourite place to work is def closing within the month, my hours have already been cut.. this is not good, i am not happy... :(

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Hey, at least it would be an honest answer, while many of those other excuses could be lies.

 

Reminds me of one case when we had a position open. Our group leader asked one candidate "Why are you interested in this job?" He answered "Actually, I'm not". He was admirably honest about that, yet didn't get hired. Afterwards, this led to an interesting discussion about how an otherwise similar candidate who simply lied convincingly to that question could have got the job. Of equivalent options, the system prefers liars. Weird, isn't it?

Oh, if there is anything interviews teach you it's whether you can lie convincingly.

I think lying is one of the top five life skills.

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Having just read the thread from page 1, this caught my attention:

 

Right now, besides taking care of our business, I support my BF who is studying architecture and I employ 10 people in our restaurant. Being self-employed has some pros and cons, as you may guess.

 

Well, as I am in the process of divorcing after an eight-years marriage, I'll find myself unemployed near December, as he will close/sell our lounge bar.

 

Were you married to your "BF" that you mentioned earlier? Why did you had to "support" his studies, if he's clearly the owner of your mutual business (will close/sell it after the divorce)? Or are those two separate persons?

 

Anyway, about myself :)

 

I started working on final year of university (mid-2000) and have been 100% employed since then - in the same institution, as a matter of fact. I've been working for Polish mid-sized bank in its headquarters always around financial markets part of the business, starting from junior positions and climbing my way up over the years. I went the road from middle office, through controlling to risk management and I'm now (since Jan 2011) a head of ALM desk directly reporting to the Management Board. Over my time here I had few opportunities to change jobs, because either I got an interesting offer or was bored / annoyed with what I was doing, but then usually I received a counter-proposal internally to move higher in the hierarchy and/or do something new, which for some reason I always preferred: I know the people, know the organisation, etc.

 

Nowadays, the risk of me losing my job got higher because our current owner plans to sell us to other bank later this year or in 2015 and the buyer obviously already has someone on my position, so I'll have to either step down or try to prove I'm the better one or at least useful to the new owner, which could be fun in itself. If however I lose the job, I'll have to go through the interviews which I don't like - especially, because I'm an introvert and succeeded my way up thanks to analytical & technical skills, rather than my communication or management skills - I'm more of a "specialist" than a "manager" type. This means I'm more fit for positions, that won't warrant the salary I (and my family...) got used to, unless I'll force myself to do something I don't really enjoy. On the other hand, with "simpler job" maybe I'll be able to finally spend more time at home with wife & kids, which isn't a bad thing by any means :)

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I started working on final year of university (mid-2000) and have been 100% employed since then - in the same institution, as a matter of fact. I've been working for Polish mid-sized bank in its headquarters always around financial markets part of the business, starting from junior positions and climbing my way up over the years. I went the road from middle office, through controlling to risk management and I'm now (since Jan 2011) a head of ALM desk directly reporting to the Management Board. Over my time here I had few opportunities to change jobs, because either I got an interesting offer or was bored / annoyed with what I was doing, but then usually I received a counter-proposal internally to move higher in the hierarchy and/or do something new, which for some reason I always preferred: I know the people, know the organisation, etc.

 

I worked in retail banking for 5 years for a Cypriot Bank In Greece, I quit and got a lump sum (AKA Golden Handshake) only 1 month before the Cypriot Banks collapsed and the ECB saved them (gotta trust your instict!!!!!)

 

I now do a job that I REAALY enjoy, I work in the office for a company in the entertainement sales and services (professional sound and lighting sales and rentals), so I'm inside the Broadcasting and club/bar/live music industry... It's full of rotten people, very demanding but it pays well and it's very rewarding at the same time +++++ I get free entrance and/or drinks at all the concerts, live stages, clubs and bars.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I worked in retail banking for 5 years for a Cypriot Bank In Greece, I quit and got a lump sum (AKA Golden Handshake) only 1 month before the Cypriot Banks collapsed and the ECB saved them (gotta trust your instict!!!!!)

 

I now do a job that I REAALY enjoy, I work in the office for a company in the entertainement sales and services (professional sound and lighting sales and rentals), so I'm inside the Broadcasting and club/bar/live music industry... It's full of rotten people, very demanding but it pays well and it's very rewarding at the same time +++++ I get free entrance and/or drinks at all the concerts, live stages, clubs and bars.

That's hell of a job mate...
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I'm currently working in Japan, for an Eikaiwa company (foreign language instruction as a business). I've been here for 10 years now, watched the company go bankrupt an get taken over by another one. They cut costs, i.e. our salaries and made us work all the time we were being paid. It was a hell too much for a lot of us who'd gotten used to getting paid a lot to do close to fuck all work, a lot left for greener pastures, most to attempt to come back later as the ass fell out of the whole market. I stayed and ended up getting promoted for no extra money: lots of extra work for no extra pay was not ideal but after a year I renegotiated my salary back to what it was before.This year I was promoted to area manager of Tokyo which is by far the biggest in the country, no extra salary but the added bonuses each year makes up for the added work and all the fucktards I have to deal with, seriously I cannot believe the number of Americans who think they're the best thing ever while actually being semi retarded, the number of Brits that won't come to work for the stupidest reasons, the Aussies who can't keep from getting sick, the Kiwis who can't get out of bed to come to work and the Canadians who are so paranoid they won't even take the company health check.In my time I've done training, recruitment and management. During my time recruiting, I had a hit tonne of applicants who I couldn't believe could make it through a day without killing themselves let alone travel abroad and get a job.CVs (Resumes) I rejected:People who had had lots of jobs in a short period of timePeople who couldn't spellPeople with rotten grammarPeople far too qualified for the position and any likely future positionsPeople who had large gaps in their employment historyInterviewees I rejected:People who wouldn't stop talkingPeople who couldn't communicate at allPeople who slagged off their previous employersPeople who said they'd never had a problem in previous jobsPeople who had no idea about the companyThe guy who showed up in a tracksuitThe guy who was late because he got distracted using facebook (actual excuse)Everyone who was late for no reason.The guy who answered his phone during the interviewThe guy who came drunkThe guy who wouldn't believe the interview was no smokingI'm so glad I don't do that anymore, it was soul destroying to see how many different ways people can fuck up a job application.

Wow interesting profile... I love the nationality bashing you did there...lol...you havent mentioned Indian's... I guess we have spared Japan ;)

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I don't actually get to meet many Indians unfortunately, not a big population here and most I see are running restaurants. We never know whether to speak English or Japanese to each other as in Japanese business you MUST say certain phrases but then we both know we speak English so it sounds awkward when we do.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Abasio, teaching English as a foreign language is something that I'm very interested in. I'm taking a TEFL certificate course next month, and I'd like to work in Asia for a year or longer; maybe quite a few years, if everything works out.

 

I'm not looking at Japan right now, but South Korea, possibly Taiwan. Still, do you have any advice (besides the dos/donts already shared) for a prospective EFL teacher?

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